San Francisco is a city famous for its affluence, progressiveness and diversity, yet the Hunters Point neighborhood is an anomaly.

During World War II, shipyard recruitment by the U.S. Navy created a thriving bedroom community for the mostly African American neighborhood. We were thriving with families purchasing homes and creating a commercial area along Third Street. Then, in 1974, the naval shipyard closed, leaving many formerly working and middle-class residents unemployed. The area was further devastated by the proliferation of crack cocaine and semi-automatic weapons in 1980s, and, today, we are considered one of the nation’s most depressed areas.

It was from the depths of this despair that Hunters Point Family was born. It is the brainchild of longtime Hunters Point resident, Lena Miller, who in 1997 founded GIRLS 2000, at the age 24, to address the specific needs of neighborhood girls like herself, and engage them in helping to revitalize the community.

Since then, HPF has designed a series of area-specific community programs focused on the entire child and based around our philosophy that they can transform their current reality and the entire community if they are 1. provided with access to needed support and resources and 2. given opportunities to gain awareness of their capabilities, develop the courage and ability to make life-affirming decisions.

Empowering young people to become the wise, compassionate and powerful leaders needed to transform San Francisco's long-troubled Bayview/Hunters Point neighborhoods has always been our goal. Our distinctive family-based program model and Afrocentric approach are specifically designed to strengthen our youth and help them realize and achieve their full potential.